Day Tour @ Kyoto, Japan

I had fun with my Malaysia’s friends but they are from the Philippines. They visit me here in Japan, their first time here. They said, “Japanese people are so honest even though they don’t speak English they respect each other so much.”

We had so much fun in 1 day trip in Kyoto, Japan take note, without my husband. But, we have interpreter my son (i’m so proud of him, he can conversed and read japanese so well and good thing is he passed to continue in studying in Japanese school (public school). Before we had tour in Kyoto, Japan. We visit the nearest and huge temple in our place.

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Katsuo-ji temple (Temple of the winner’s luck)

The temple is situated in the mountains north of the Osaka plain and has been a place of worship for several thousand years, an unparalleled sacred site founded on the spiritual power of the mountain  and a faith build up over 1,300 years.

In 727, early in the nara period (710-784) two holy priests name Zenchu and Zensan constructed a hut on this mountain. with these two priests as teachers, Prince Kaijo, a son of the Emperor Konin (770-781), established Mirokuji Temple in 765 in his quest to reach the spiritual realm of Buddha.

Kyoto 1-day bus-ticket.
Kyoto 1-day bus-ticket.

I recommend the 1-day pass bus ticket. You can just hop in anytime you want going to the destination within Kyoto. Of course, we have to visit the famous tourist spot. First stop will be the far from the station which is “The Golden Pavilion”

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Kinkaku / Rokuon-ji Temple

Kinkaku (The Golden Pavilion) is a sharien, a Buddhist hall containing relics of Buddha. The pavilion is part of a temple that is formally named Rokuon-ji temple, but commonly called Kinkaku-ji Temple,or Temple of the Golden Pavilion. Rokuon-ji is a Zen Buddhist temple, is the Shokokuji School of the Rinzai Sect. This Area was originally the site of a villa called Kitayama-dai and owned by a statesman, Saionji Kintsune. Ashikaga Yoshimitsu, the 3rd shogun of the Muromachi period, took a liking to the area and acquired it from the Saionji family in 1397. he then built his own villa, which he named Kitayama-den.

Nijo Castle (with my Son)
Nijo Castle (with my Son)

Nijo Castle (Nijo-jo)

The castle was originally built in 1603 as the official Kyoto residence of the first Tokugawa Shogun, Ieyusa. It was completed in 1626 by the third Tokugawa Shogun, Iemitsu, with the addition of some structures transferred from Fushimi Castle (built in the Momoyama Period; 1573-1614). Nijo Castle is one of the finest examples of early Edo period and Momoyama culture in Japan, as it makes splendid use of early Edo period building designs, lavish paintings,a nd carvings that Iemitsu generously commissioned. In 1867, when Yoshinobu, the fifteenth Tokugawa Shogun returned sovereignty to the Emperor, the castle became the property of the Imperial family. In 1884,  it was renamed the Nijo Detached Palace. It was donated to the City of Kyoto and renamed Nijo Castle (Nijo-jo) in 1939. The castle was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1994.

Kiyomizu-dera
Kiyomizu-dera

Kiyomizu-dera

Kiyomizu-dera was founded in the early Heian period.The temple was founded in 798, and its present buildings were constructed in 1633, ordered by the Tokugawa Iemitsu. There is not a single nail used in the entire structure. It takes its name from the waterfall within the complex, which runs off the nearby hills.Kiyomizu means clear water, or pure water.

It was originally affiliated with the old and influential Hossō sect dating from Nara times. However, in 1965 it severed that affiliation, and its present custodians call themselves members of the “Kitahossō” sect.

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Yasaka PagodaYasaka Shrine

Yasaka-no-to Pagoda stands mostly alone, the buildings of the temple of which it once belonged (Hokan-ji Temple) having been destroyed by fires, earthquakes and wars over the years. We’re thankful that the pagoda survived, because it’s a stunner. It stands at the top of Yasaka-dori, which is itself unique for the lack of overhead power lines, which were removed to preserve the view of the pagoda. The pagoda can easily be accessed from Higashioji-dori, or by ducking off of the bottom of Ninen-zaka. It’s particularly lovely after dark, especially when the lone cherry tree at the base of the pagoda is in bloom.

Yasaka Shrine once called Gion Shrine (祇園神社 Gion-jinja?), is a Shinto shrine in the Gion District of Kyoto, Japan. Situated at the east end of Shijō-dōri (Fourth Avenue), the shrine includes several buildings, including gates, a main hall and a stage.

Initial construction on the Shrine began in 656. The Shrine became the object of Imperial patronage during the early Heian period. In 965, Emperor Murakami ordered that Imperial messengers be sent to report important events to the guardian kami of Japan. These heihaku were initially presented to 16 shrines; and in 991, Emperor Ichijō added three more shrines to Murakami’s list. Three years later in 994, Ichijō refined the scope of that composite list by adding Umenomiya Shrine and Gion Shrine.

From 1871 through 1946, Yasaka Shrine was officially designated one of the Kanpei-taisha (官幣大社?), meaning that it stood in the first rank of government supported shrines.

After those iconiq spot in Kyoto. We can feel the ache of our legs in walking up and down but it worth it. My visitors enjoyed a lot even though they are tired. Same as my son, he enjoyed and happy being a interpreter (non-stop talking). It just easy to take train and commute than driving a car, as you will have a problem where to park especially now is a peak season. So, better yet take public transportation, feel to be a japanese for a while experience it.

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