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Arashiyama, Kyoto, Japan

We do really enjoy coming back here, especially when spring time or let say cherry blossoms sightseeing. But, sad to say we are too early so, we didn’t see any cherry blossoms in the street (few only) and in the mountain.

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We just took a train going Arashiyama, Kyoto for about 1hr & 15mins. And, we decided to eat first from the stall we walk by.

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This is the only cherry blossom we saw

Arashiyama (嵐山 Storm Mountain) is a district on the western outskirts of Kyoto, Japan. It also refers to the mountain across the Ōi River, which forms a backdrop to the district. Arashiyama is a nationally designated Historic Site and Place of Scenic Beauty.

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Look our little princess, she so cute. Even the tourist in the street they took a pictures of her. And, she’s not shy to smile in the stranger camera.
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our friends also tried the japanese traditional dress which is “Kimono”

The kimono (着物, きもの) is a Japanese traditional garment. The word “kimono”, which actually means a “thing to wear” (ki “wear” and mono “thing”),[2] has come to denote these full-length robes. The standard plural of the word kimono in English is kimonos, but the unmarked Japanese plural kimono is also sometimes used. The kimono is always used in important festival or formal moments, it is the representative of polite and a very formal clothing.

Kimono has T-shaped, straight-lined robes worn so that the hem falls to the ankle, with attached collars and long, wide sleeves. Kimono are wrapped around the body, always with the left side over the right (except when dressing the dead for burial)andsecured by a sash called an obi, which is tied at the back. Kimono are generally worn with traditional footwear (especially zōri or geta) and split-toe socks (tabi).

Today, kimono are most often worn by women and on special occasions. Traditionally, unmarried women wore a style of kimono called furisode, with almost floor-length sleeves, on special occasions. A few older women and even fewer men still wear the kimono on a daily basis. Men wear the kimono most often at weddings, tea ceremonies, and other very special or very formal occasions. Professional sumo wrestlers are often seen in the kimono because they are required to wear traditional Japanese dress whenever appearing in public.

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I loved their store here, old and vintage.
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Bamboo Groove

Notable tourist sites

  • The Iwatayama Monkey Park on the slopes of Arashiyama. Over 170 monkeys live at the park. While the monkeys are wild, they have become accustomed to humans. The park is on a small mountain not far from the Saga-Arashiyama rail station. Visitors can approach and photograph the monkeys. At the summit is a fenced enclosure where visitors can feed the monkeys.
  • The “Moon Crossing Bridge” (渡月橋, Togetsukyō), notable for its views of cherry blossoms and autumn colors on the slopes of Arashiyama.
  • The tombstone of the Heike courtesan Kogo of Sagano.
  • Tenryū-ji, the main temple of one of the 15 branches of the Rinzai school, one of the two main sects of Zen Buddhism in Japan.
  • The hamlet of Kiyotaki, a small scenic village at the base of Mt. Atago, the home to a notable Shinto shrine.
  • Matsunoo-taisha, a shrine half a mile south of the area, is home to a blessed spring. It is one of the oldest shrines in the Kyoto area, founded in 700. The alleged restorative properties of the spring bring many local sake and miso companies for prayers that their product will be blessed.
  • Kameyama koen has a stone commemorating Zhou Enlai‘s visit to Arashiyama. He was moved by the cherry blossoms and mountain greenery. The four poems he wrote about his visit are engraved on a stone monument: “Arashiyama in the Rain.”
  • Ōkōchi Sansō, the Japanese-style home and gardens of the film actor Denjirō Ōkōchi.
  • Cherry trees bloom in spring and leaves turns red in autumn.

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Our first time to try this Owl’s Forest. Stumbled upon this place while walking through a the train station and we saw this sign Cats Cafe and Owl Forest. Unfortunately, the Cat’s Cafe is closed. Worth it to go here in Owl Forest so fluffy and so cute. There were about 10 different cute fluffy owls that you can pet! They even had owls that looked like the ones from Harry Potter!

We do really enjoy going here because we didn’t have decent lunc,so we decided to eat in Kin no Buta (shabu-shabu)

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Eat-All-You-Can Pork and reasonable price

But of course, I also took a video check below.

Thank you for visiting my blog. Have a great day!

♥lovelots♥

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Mt. Yoshino (Nara)

This long overdue, so sorry I was busy with my son for his school preparation, we only have 1 weeks for that as the Grade 2 finished, a week after, his on Grade 3 already. But, at least he can write and speak Japanese already so, we’re not worried anymore. Anyway, let’s get started.
We had a great time viewing the Sakura (Cherry blossom) in Mt. Yoshino, Nara.

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Mt. Yoshino is well known from old times for the best cherry blossom site in Japan.
It covers all over the mountain paths around 8 kms, from the north end to the south of Omine Renzan mountains.
It is also a base of Omine spiritual mountain walk for decipliants. A path between Yoshino-Omine and Yuya is called Omine Okukudou and is still used for religeous training.
The spiritual site and path in Kii, including Mt. Yoshino, was approved as one of UNESCO World Heritage.
This means the area is registered in the World Heritage List per World Heritage Treaty for the purpose of maintaining the area as an indespensable property shared by all humans.
The whole Mt. Yoshino is registered as World Heritage: You can walk and visite various World Heritage Buildings including Yoshino Mikumari Shrine, Kinpu Shrine, Kinpusenji Temple and Yoshimizu Shrine.

You can also visit a variety of historical sites such as a temple of Ennogyoja (Ennnoozuno), historical site of Nanchou, Yoshitsune, Saigyou and Basho.
Not only spring Cherry blossom but hydrengea, autumn leaves and snowing landscape are also magnificent.

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With around 30,000 cherry trees decorating the mountain range, Nara Prefecture’s Mt. Yoshino is proudly regarded as “Japan’s best cherry blossom site.” The appearance of the cherry blossoms of these “sacred trees” continuously planted over 1,300 years across the mountainside dotted with World Heritage Listed temples and shrines, takes on an almost otherworldly beauty. While walking around this mountainside cherry blossom park of Mt. Yoshino, we introduce you to Hanakueshiki Festival, which is its main ceremonial event of spring, as well as the World Heritage Listed temples and shrines located here.

DSC_0058DSC_0065Rather than a free standing mountain, Yoshinoyama is a north-facing mountain slope. It is divided into four areas: the Shimo Senbon (lower 1000 trees) at the base of the mountain, Naka Senbon (middle 1000 trees), Kami Senbon (upper 1000 trees) and Oku Senbon (inner 1000 trees) at the top of the mountain. Visitors can enjoy the cherry trees as they ascend the mountain, passing Yoshino’s touristy town with its various temples and shrines, and enjoying hanami in the parks and viewpoints along the way.DSC_0067

The Shimo Senbon (lower) area encompasses the base of the mountain around Yoshino Station and the lower part of the town. The Yoshino Ropeway bypasses the steep ascent between the station and the town, but waiting times for the ropeway can get very long during the peak of the season. Lots of cherry trees are planted along the road up to the town, making the ascent on foot an attractive alternative to the ropeway.

The Naka Senbon (middle) area covers the rest of the town along the ridge of the mountain. This is where the majority of Yoshino’s accommodations, shops, restaurants, temples and shrines are found, including Kinpusenji Temple and Yoshimizu Shrine. The view up the mountain from Yoshimizu Shrine is particularly famous.

Towards the top of the Naka Senbon area lies the Naka Senbon Park, one of the most attractive spots for holding hanami picnics under the trees. The park spans several small hills that are covered by cherry trees and offer views onto even more cherry trees. Especially in good weather, the atmosphere here is delightful.

Further up the mountain in the Kami Senbon (upper) area, the town begins to thin out. Kami Senbon tends to be a little less crowded and slightly quieter than the lower parts of the mountain, and several small parks provide nice places to take a break. The most famous panoramic view of Yoshinoyama can be enjoyed from the Hanayagura View Point, about one hour on foot from the upper ropeway station.

The Oku Senbon area has by far the fewest cherry trees and does not offer any views of the cherry tree covered mountain slopes. However, the trees here bloom about a week behind the rest of Yoshinoyama, so it may be worth visiting if you are too late to see the blossoms along the lower slopes. The best hanami spot in the Oku Senbon area is the Takagiyama Observation Deck roughly a 90 minute walk from the ropeway station.

And, we didn’t know the bus we took is going down the mountain is not going to the train station. oh my, our boo boo experience. We have to ride again a bus going back to the top of the mountain and down to the Train station.

I had a time took a video from the bus and walking down the mountain, i hope you like it.

This is my first time to edit video and i don’t know if this is right in editing. anyway, for personal use only. 

 

Thank you for visiting….

***bye***