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Osaka Castle, Japan

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Every time, we have visitors, they intend to check this castle one of the tourist spots in Osaka. Fascinating, as they still maintain the look of this castle. But, to think I didn’t have a chance to go inside because the line is so long take our time. Anyway, outside is a better view and see the rock fence beside it and those trees (Cherry Blossom) but, sad to say the flower of the cherry blossom are not blooming yet, too early.

Osaka Castle (大坂城 or 大阪城,Ōsaka-jō?) is a Japanese castle in Chūō-ku, Osaka, Japan. The castle is one of Japan’s most famous landmarks and it played a major role in the unification of Japan during the sixteenth century of the Azuchi-Momoyama period.

The main tower of Osaka Castle is situated on a plot of land roughly one square kilometer. It is built on two raised platforms of landfill supported by sheer walls of cut rock, using a technique called Burdock piling, each overlooking a moat. The central castle building is five stories on the outside and eight stories on the inside, and built atop a tall stone foundation to protect its occupants from attackers.

History

In 1583 Toyotomi Hideyoshi commenced construction on the site of the Ikkō-ikki temple of Ishiyama Hongan-ji. The basic plan was modeled after Azuchi Castle, the headquarters of Oda Nobunaga. Toyotomi wanted to build a castle that mirrored Oda’s, but surpassed it in every way: the plan featured a five-story main tower, with three extra stories underground, and gold leaf on the sides of the tower to impress visitors. In 1585 the Inner donjon was completed. Toyotomi continued to extend and expand the castle, making it more and more formidable to attackers. In 1597 construction was completed and Hideyoshi died. Osaka Castle passed to his son, Toyotomi Hideyori.
In 1600 Tokugawa Ieyasu defeated his opponents at the Battle of Sekigahara, and started his own bakufu (i.e., shogunate) in Edo. In 1614 Tokugawa attacked Toyotomi in the winter, starting the Siege of Osaka.[4] Although the Toyotomi forces were outnumbered approximately two to one, they managed to fight off Tokugawa’s 200,000-man army and protect the castle’s outer walls. Ieyasu had the castle’s outer moat filled, negating one of the castle’s main outer defenses.
During the summer of 1615, Hideyori began to restore the outer moat. Tokugawa, in outrage, sent his armies to Osaka Castle again, and routed the Toyotomi men inside the outer walls on June 4. Osaka Castle fell to Tokugawa, and the Toyotomi clan perished.
In 1620, the new heir to the shogunate, Tokugawa Hidetada, began to reconstruct and re-arm Osaka Castle. He built a new elevated main tower, five stories on the outside and eight stories on the inside, and assigned the task of constructing new walls to individual samurai clans. The walls built in the 1620s still stand today, and are made out of interlocked granite boulders without mortar. Many of the stones were brought from rock quarries near the Seto Inland Sea, and bear inscribed crests of the various families who contributed them.
In 1660, lightning ignited the gunpowder warehouse and the resulting explosion set the castle on fire. In 1665, lightning struck and burnt down the main tower. In 1843, after decades of neglect, the castle got much-needed repairs when the bakufu collected money from the people of the region to rebuild several of the turrets.
In 1868, Osaka Castle fell and was surrendered to anti-bakufu imperial loyalists. Much of the castle was burned in the civil conflicts surrounding the Meiji Restoration.
Under the Meiji government, Osaka Castle became part of the Osaka Army Arsenal (Osaka Hohei Kosho) manufacturing guns, ammunition, and explosives for Japan’s rapidly expanding Western-style military.[5]
In 1928, the main tower was restored after the mayor of Osaka concluded a highly successful fund-raising drive.
During World War II, the arsenal became one of the largest military armories, employing 60,000 workers.[5] Bombing raids targeting the arsenal damaged the reconstructed main castle tower and, on August 14, 1945, destroyed 90% of the arsenal and killed 382 people working there.
In 1995, Osaka’s government approved yet another restoration project, with the intent of restoring the main tower to its Edo-era splendor. In 1997, restoration was completed. The castle is a concrete reproduction (including elevators) of the original and the interior is intended as a modern, functioning museum.

We got our friend to take us the pictures, ’cause every time our family will go here I don’t have my decent picture unless I will take a selfie.
I had a chance to take video with my daughter with her new playmates. Please check below.

 

Thank you for visiting my blog. Have a great day!

♥lovelots♥

∇ΣΠÙ∫

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Kidzania, Kobe, Japan

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Our first time to go here and we didn’t know that we need to reserve before we go inside. At first, we didn’t know luckily the Kidzania beside it was a mall (Lalaport) so, we just look around and kids play in the mini park for awhile. Well, my husband need to reserve slot on Monday and Monday is a holiday so good. But, we had a reservation on the 2nd shift (4pm-9pm) the 1st shift was (9am-3pm) but they can still stay there until they like.

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This is their first job in the Printing Press. Not so lucky we didn’t get a slot to Sushi Restaurant, Pizza, Ambulance and Fire Fighter job. Maybe next time we need to get the first shift.

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And he just wanted to be policeman in a real life as well, luckily still have slot to do this job.

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Soft Ice Cream for my little princess, in real life she loves ice cream so much.

They exprience to do the Cabin Attendant (daughter) and Pilot (son).

And their favorite job they like both of them in the Train. My daughter as a train driver and my son as an attendant/announcer.

My kids, really hada great time here in this place, but we have short time to explore more. It’s educating and know what they want when they get old. But, of course my little princess we still don’t know. Their’s a lot of things to do here. Maybe next time we I‘ll post again for more job they applied.

I uploaded video from my channel in youtube kindly check below:

 

Thank you for visiting my blog. Have a great day!

♥lovelots♥

∇ΣΠÙ∫

Japan Bicycle

Yesterday, we decided to buy bicycle (bike) for us with toddler seater at the back and also we will ask to repair the old bike of my son. But, sad to say they no longer repair it and it was rusty already, so they give us uption to trade in and just add some cost on the new and updated bicycle for boys.

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As you all know, Japan bike is a necessity for the people in Japan. You won’t see any house or family that don’t owned a bicycle. For me, it will take time to learn my Japanese to drive here in japan best way is to just ride this bicycle. Btw, my bicycle is motor or let say battery operated. But, owning a bike/bicycle here in Japan you should know the dont’s and do’s or rather the rules and regulation. Here are the some of it.

  1. Register your bike, just in case it will be stolen even though Japanese people are honest, but still it still regulation. You can report you stolen bicycle/bike to the police and they are serious to find it. If someone did, riding or using it not registered to their names they will pay the penalty, which i don’t know yet.
  2. Riding tandem on a single-seater bike, while its no problem for anyone over the age of 16 to ride a bicycle fitted with a child seat (that one i have above). it’s against the law for 2 people to balance on a bike designed for 1 rider.

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3. Calling, texting & other phone use, just like when driving a car is dangerous when talking on the phone as well. You have to stop at the side of the road and do whatever you want to do with your phone.

5055516214. Holding an umbrella, you’re not in the circus to do this, well, I have seen some of the oldies doing it. Dangerous you will lose control the handle of the bike and some more when the wind blow it might out of the balance. Just wear raincoat has been just usual and common in japan when riding a bike/bicycle.

japanese-businessman-rides-a-bike-while-holding-an-umbrella-past-a-fnewbw5. Wearing Earphones, oh, I’ve seen a lot of these days more on teenagers. It’s important of all time to be aware of your surroundings, anything that may prevent you from hearing an approaching car or a pedestrian about to cross your path is potentially dangerous. Anyway, just enjoy the view and nature blowing winds, leaves swaying and also in Japan they don’t horn because horning is rude for then. They really get mad when you horn someone.

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6. Riding without a light at night, Usually, the standard to the bicycle are the reflector. But here in Japan, they want to have a front light attached to your bike/bicycle is forbidden; and one of the police pays attention when conducting evening spot checks. And of course, visibility at night time is a serious concern.

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7. Riding side by side, just like walking side by side, cycling, traveling in parallel take up a fair amount of space preventing incoming or cyclist from passing.

8. Obstructing pedestrian, some area do not have dedicated cycle lanes. Cyclist often find themselve to share narrow pavements with pedestrian and the chances of either getting other’s way is high. In the case, where a cyclist’s path would just give way or stop to the people walking.

8things_bike_stop9. Cycling under the influence, Don’t drive when you’re drunk. Right? No need to explain this more as you all know what will happen.

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I just love my new ride…and ready for the rainy season.

***BYE***

 

 

Asakusa trip

Before heading to our real trip in Tokyo, we had 3days and 2nights at the Asakusa area. We took the bullet train from Osaka to Tokyo. We left in our house around 7am, and I still have time to eat breakfast in McDonald.   
 

Then, took a local train from the main station, Tokyo to Asakusa station I think we transfer twice, and the 2nd train doesn’t have elevator it was under renovation… Hubby tired lifting our luggage. 3 luggage I think more than 20kg, poor hubby right… That’s why we don’t want to travel in Tokyo because some old train station don’t have an elevator, not convenient for the traveller with a toddler.  

We arrived at our destination around past 12noon at Asakusa View Hotel, exhausted and we had to find something to eat especially for the kids for lunch. Luckily, Asakusa area there are a lot of eateries which we can’t decide, hehehe

http://www.viewhotels.co.jp/asakusa/

  
  

Rest for a while in the hotel. My hubby is excited about this area the Kappa-bashi is the kitchenware kitchen tool shops.

Kappabashi Dougu-Gai is a shopping street with more than a century-long history, located between Asakusa and Ueno in the shitamachi or old downtown area of Tokyo. The street, running 800 meters north to south, is lined with some 170 specialty stores offering Japanese, Chinese, and Western tableware and lacquerware, Japanese confectionery and bread makers, kitchen tools and utensils, food ingredients and packaging supplies, and more. The beauty is that even ordinary consumers can buy professional appliances and implements. Japanese kitchen knives and faux food samples are a favorite of foreign customers. 

Website:http://www.kappabashi.or.jp

  

We choose the hotel because they said (tv program) the breakfast is delicious, but, sad to say there is nothing special (sorry to disappoint) but, the location is really accessible. Or maybe, because we tried many hotels in our countries, that’s why our standard is high (?). 

Below are the sightseeing around Asakusa Area

 
 Kaminari Gate (furai shrine gate)

Built by Tairano Kinmasa in the 5th year of the Tengyou Era, this gate was originally located in the Komagata neighborhood. During the Kamakura Era it was dismantled and relocated to its current location. It is believed that that is when Wind God and God of Thunder were enshrined within.

At first they were to guard the temple. These two guards were worshipped with the goal of guarding against destruction from storm, flood and fire. They were seen as a kind of benevolent deity. Then it is surmised that the worship was for peace and tranquility, and abundant crop.

The current gate replaced the gate which was destroyed by fire on December 12, 1865. In 1960, after 95 years, the gate was reconstructed thanks to contributions by the founder of Matsushita Electrical Industrial, Kounosuke Matsushita. It now stands proudly as the main gate at of Sensou Shrine. It is famous nation wide as the face of Asakusa.

Website:http://www.senso-ji.jp/

   

 Nakamise Avenue

This roughly 250-meter-long path leading from the Kaminarimon (“Thunder Gate”) to Hozomon (“Treasure House Gate”) of Kinryuzan Sensoji Temple (also called “Kannon-sama”) in Asakusa is lined on both sides with close to 90 shops and stalls selling Edo-style trinkets and souvenirs.

  

Sensoji Temple

Founded in 628, Sensoji Temple is the oldest temple in Tokyo. Many people believe that the Asakusa Kannon deity enshrined here has the ability to bestow benefits on earth, and around 30 million visitors from throughout Japan and abroad visit the temple every year. It was the epicenter for the development of Edo culture, and these traces still remain today. Many seasonal events are held including the Hozuki (Chinese lantern plant) Market and Hagoita (wooden paddle) Market. The huge lanterns hung at Kaminari (Thunder) Gate are very famous throughout Japan.

Website:http://www.senso-ji.jp/about/index_e.html

   
   

TOKYO SKYTREE, at 634 meters high, is the world’s tallest free-standing broadcasting tower. The TEMBO DECK, located 350 meters above ground, commands a panoramic view of the Kanto region, and even Mt. Fuji in the distance when the sky is clear. At night, the tower is illuminated alternately in the beautiful pale blue “Iki” and violet “Miyabi” themes. Tokyo Solamachi, the neighboring commercial complex, is home to more than 300 establishments including a planetarium, an aquarium, and shops, which constantly transmit trends and information. TOKYO SKYTREE is a world-class landmark of Tokyo.

 

 Asakusa Engei Hall is the district’s only theater dedicated to rakugo. Besides this form of comical storytelling, it stages a variety of entertaining acts such as manzai and mandan stand-up comedy, magic, acrobatics, papercutting, and music.

The open year-round facility, as a rule, has no intermission between day and night acts. Spectators are welcome to show up at any time, leave at any time, and enjoy the traditional Japanese entertainment of rakugo for as long as they like.

   
 

Ueno Park (上野公園 Ueno Kōen?) is a spacious public park in the Ueno district of Taitō, Tokyo, Japan. The park was established in 1873 on lands formerly belonging to the temple of Kan’ei-ji. Amongst the country’s first public parks, it was founded following the western example as part of the borrowing and assimilation of international practices that characterizes the early Meiji period. The home of a number of major museums, Ueno Park is also celebrated in spring for its cherry blossoms and hanami. In recent times the park and its attractions have drawn over ten million visitors a year, making it Japan’s most popular city park.

Website: http://www.kensetsu.metro.tokyo.jp/toubuk/ueno/index_top.html

  

She loves chasing the bird. Drop by in the shopping street as while just look around. 

   
 
And i just want to share the train station connect which i always get dizzy looking at it…  

 

Ok, let’s park for awhile… Will post the next trip soon…

Thank you for your time reading/visiting my blog.

***bye***

Golden Week Vacay (May 6-8, 2015)

Sorry for the late post… busy in studying Japanese (Nihonggo)… so, hard to composed sentence. Some more, i have to memorize the kanji (chinese character) beside from Hiragana and Katakana…

Anyway, our Golden Week Vacay we had it in Wakayama Prefecture from May 6 to 8 (3 days). If you love nature, i definitely recommend to go here. I love the smell of the fresh air and those trees in the mountain really can smell the green leaves.

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We came together with our Church friends. We had a great time and greenery scenery. It’s a long from Minoo, Osaka to Aridagawa, Wakayama  but its worth it. (See below more pictures)

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We stayed in a cottage like a cabin style  house.  Here’s the links for the area Aridagawa, Wakayama

The next day we have time to go around. (See below pictures) 

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Had fun time with the kids in the river

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Grapes Fields

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i forgot the name of this dripping flower.

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Hanging Bridge

Before we end our vacay (going home) we drop by first in one of the World Heritage shrine and Temple. (see below pictures)

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Mount Kōya (高野山 Kōya-san?) is the name of mountains in Wakayama Prefecture to the south of Osaka. Also, Kōya-san is a modifying word for Kongōbu-ji (金剛峯寺). There is no one mountain officially called Kōya-san (高野山) in Japan.

First settled in 819 by the monk Kūkai, Mt. Kōya is primarily known as the world headquarters of the Kōyasan Shingon sect of Japanese Buddhism. Located in an 800 m high valley amid the eight peaks of the mountain (which was the reason this location was selected, in that the terrain is supposed to resemble a lotus plant), the originalmonastery has grown into the town of Kōya, featuring a university dedicated to religious studies and 120 temples, many of which offer lodging to pilgrims. The mountain is home to the following famous sites:

  • Okunoin (奥の院), the mausoleum of Kūkai, surrounded by an immense graveyard (the largest in Japan)
  • Danjogaran (壇上伽藍), a heartland of Mt. Kōya.
    • Konpon Daitō (根本大塔), a pagoda that according to Shingon doctrine represents the central point of a mandala covering not only Mt. Kōya but all of Japan
  • Kongōbu-ji (金剛峯寺), the head temple of the Kōyasan Shingon Buddhism
  • Kōyasan chōishi-michi, the traditional route up the mountain
  • It also houses a replica of the Nestorian stele[1]

In 2004, UNESCO designated Mt. Kōya, along with two other locations on the Kii Peninsula, Yoshino and Omine; and Kumano Sanzan, as World Heritage SitesSacred Sites and Pilgrimage Routes in the Kii Mountain Range“.

We really enjoyed our vacay, this is our first time with vacay with friends in Japan.

Part 3 – PH Vacay

Day 10 – Aug.10 (Sun)
Before we go somewhere, we have to say thank you to our almighty god just nearby our hotel. Afterwards, we went to talk if the town SM Aura. We thought that it was big it just a 4 storey mall and we enjoy the roof top/deck.

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Our lunch at the vietnamese cuisine.

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Day 11 – Aug.11 (Mon)
Swimming time at the hotel and bonding as well.

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We stroll and buy some “pasalubong” (presents) in the SM Megamall big mall and meet my mom to hand over those cute dress of my daughter.

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We had dinner at goto king. Craving for porridge.

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Love it!

Grocery time for our supplies that we can’t buy it in Japan at Robinsons Supermarket
Look what we have here nice ads Coke!

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Day12 – Aug.12 (Tues)
Strolled at the Eastwood and start packing
Dinner @ Sbarro at the Eastwood Mall

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Meet some friends at the SM Megamall alone took a taxi get scared of it the way they drive some more i’m not get use to it commute in my own land 😦

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Friends for life… They were my friends since 1998 when i was a single they know all my pass bf or exes. Knows the reason why we broke up as well. Eventhough we all apart we still don’t forget to communicate to each other some more if someone are going back to the philippines we will give a time to meet. A non-stop chitty chat and laughing. Some gossiping as well from the past, celebrity, politics etc topics.

Day 13 – Aug.13 (Tues)
Our flight day. Once more before we leave, 2nd breakfast at Jollibee.

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And paalam Pilipinas at the terminal 2 (philippine airlines)

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We reach in Japan around 7pm safe, eat dinner first before we go home.

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End of our Vacay now back to normal.