Shirahama, Beach

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After we reach from the hotel we have time to check the nearest beach in our hotel. They said it has white sand. Yes, Indeed, it has white sand. As you all know my country (The Philippines) has a lot of beaches from white, pink and black. Better yet, I will try to post it if I have time too, because Summer is around the corner. So, that you can have an idea where to go this coming summer.

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Shirahama (白浜町Shirahama-chō?) is a town in Nishimuro District, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan.

Shirahama is a resort town on the south coast of Wakayama Prefecture. Its beaches are white sand, imported from Australia.[citation needed] Shirahama is known for its hot springs. During the summer (July and August), there are fireworks every night on the beach.[citation needed]

Shirahama is about two and a half hours from Osaka by JR West‘s Ocean Arrow train service. There are daily flights from Nanki-Shirahama Airport to Tokyo’s Tokyo International Airport (Haneda).

On March 1, 2006 the town of Hikigawa, from Nishimuro District, was merged into Shirahama.[citation needed]

As of January 31, 2012, the town has an estimated population of 23,325, with 11,149 households, and a population density of 116.02 persons per km. The total area is 201.04 km.

Wow, the white sand was imported from Australia, that’s awesome.  Anyway, the hotel staff told us, when summer they are fully booked and the beach is crowded.We want to experience the kids to go on the beach and swim. They didn’t experience yet. So, if ever this is their first time. (on summer plan) Anyway, they can’t even touch the water because is waving to fast and the water is freezing cold.

Look at the pictures, they way they smile and play the water. Definitely, we have to plan a trip to the beach this coming summer. It’s also about time I need to get serious in dieting so that I can wear bathing suits with confidence.

We got the chance to see the “Engetsu Island”

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Engetsu Island (円月島Engetsu-tō) is a small island off the coast of Shirahama, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan. It includes a natural arch through which seawater passes. Its official name is Takashima (高嶋), and it is approximately 35 metres (115 ft) east-to-west, 130 metres (430 ft) north-to-south, and 25 metres (82 ft) high at the tallest.

The island is largely formed of sandstone and has become less stable over time. Since July 2009, the Shirahama town government has cautioned against approaching the island because of the risk of collapse of the arch.

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We will surely plan this coming summer to visit this island. There’s a lot to see, now my daughter can walk longer I think she’ll be okay on a long walk.

here’s the video:

Thank you for visiting my blog. Have a great day!

♥lovelots♥

∇ΣΠÙ∫

Long Drive trip

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This is the hotel lobby that we have gone far from our home. 2hours 30mins if you just drive you don’t stop in the Service Area.

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But us, we eat breakfast at McDo then drive for 2hours then stop ove in Service Area but Wakayama Prefecture.

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And, we reach in the hotel around 2PM, check in and drop our luggage and suprise room is huge. 3Rooms, 1 Massage Room, Sauna, 2 Toilet and Bathroom.

You can actually, have atleast 3 family in this room. Is a huge and also huge key. you won’t forget it as big as this.

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We have time to go around the hotel before we go out and explore the vicinity.

Here’s the Lobby, we had dinner and breakfast, their foods mixed cuisine. I didn’t have time to take photo the arrangement of the buffet and the set of tables. 😦

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The hoteltheme is like Egypt style. but, I don’t understand the Rabbit in the roof of the building.

Here’s site of the hotelKawakyu Hotel, Wakayama

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This is the lobby that is huge and in the side and front outside of the hotel.

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Of course in this hotel their is a Onsen, which we also tried it. (right picture) our front door room

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This is the best part of the hotel, In our floor (8th floor) only can have spend time in the Imperial Lounge where you can drink all you can (Alcohol or non-alcohol)

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Swimming pool area and the Jacuzzi, outdoor my daughter we just finished our hotspring (onsen).

Below are the foods (breakfast and dinner)

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Thank you for visiting my blog. Have a great day!

♥lovelots♥

∇ΣΠÙ∫

Day trip at Kitano, Kyoto (Japan)

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We had a day trip from Osaka to this place. Kitano Tenmangu, Kyoto, Japan. It was a beautiful place and so huge shrine.

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The Kitano Tenmangu Shrine is a shrine built in the northwest section of Kyoto over 1000 years ago. The shrine was built during 947AD by the emperor of the time in honor of Sugawara no Michizane, a scholar and politician who represented the middle Heian period (794 AD – 1185 AD), as well as for the peace of the nation. Ever since, the imperial family, nobles, samurais and commoners alike all visit the shrine to worship.
The Kitano Tenmangu Shrine is the very first shrine in Japanese history where an actual person was enshrined as a deity. He is known as the “god of agriculture,” “god of honesty and sincerity,” “god of dispelling false accusations” and “god of performing arts.” However, he is best known for being the “god of academics.” Sugawara no Michizane is a historical figure who read poems at the age of five and wrote Chinese poems at the age of 11. His superior talent is what led to the dissemination of the “Tenjin faith” throughout Japan. There are as many as 12,000 shrines that are dedicated to Sugawara no Michizane in Japan, but the Kitano Tenmangu Shrine is the origin and the main shrine. To this day, many students that pray for passing scores on examinations and persons who wish for the improvement of their abilities come here to visit.

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The main shrine, where the deity is enshrined, is positioned behind the worship hall, which is connected by the “Ishi-no-Ma Hall.” The main shrine, worship hall and the Ishi-no-Ma Hall have roofs above them, and by combining them all, create a large, elegant roof. This unique construction method, due to having numerous buildings, is called a “yatsumune-zukuri” (multi-building construction). The current shrine was constructed by Toyotomi Hideyori during the twelfth year of the Keicho era (1607 AD) and is designated as a national treasure.
The main shrine, Ro-mon Gate and Sanko-mon Gate were all built at the same time. They all have golden decorations, finely-detailed sculpting and vivid colors, fitting for the unique design of the Momoyama period (1573 AD – 1603 AD).

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The vast shrine grounds have many more things to see. It is known as one of the nation’s best places to view ume trees. When the flowers bloom, the Bai-en (ume garden) is open to the public. The ume blossom festival on February 25 has a tea ceremony where the geiko and maiko of Kamishichiken come to serve matcha and sweets.
During the season of the red maple trees, there is the Momiji-en (autumn maple garden) where one can see 250 maple trees. Remnants of the “Odoi,” an earthen mount of fortification built by Toyotomi Hideyoshi encircling Kyoto, can be seen here as well. They are designated as national historical sites and these historic remains have fused with the natural surroundings and have become a scenic view with an atmosphere unique to Japan. Also, having its roots on the anniversary of the birth and death of Sugawara no Michizane, on the 25th of each month, there is a street market called “Tenjin-san’s Festival” that is held within the shrine grounds as well as in the outer areas. You can purchase food, sundries, used clothes and used tools at the stalls here. The market is bustling from early morning at 6 AM to 9 PM, with many visitors.

Etiquette during visit

Visiting shrines originally was done with prayer to the gods in appreciation for their daily lives and also asking to be protected in the future. Each custom that is formulated through our long history has meaning. Please enjoy your visit to the shrine while following the proper etiquette.

Before visiting, “Customs on Hand Washing”

Hand washing has its roots in the “Misogi” (purification) rituals. Sins and taints that have accumulated on the person without their knowledge were purified through dipping into the rivers or ocean. The custom gradually shifted to rinsing one’s hands and mouth. After passing through the Ro-mon Gate, you will see the Chozuya, a site for the ritual cleansing of your hands, to your right.

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Hold the ladle in your right hand, fill it with water, and wash your left hand with it.

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Then switch the ladle to your left hand, and wash your right hand.

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Hold the ladle on your right hand again, and pour some water into your left hand to rinse your mouth. At this time, do not put your lips directly onto the ladle and do not drink the water.

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Wash your left hand one more time.

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Hold the ladle vertically to wash the handle with the remaining water.

Basics of Visiting 1: “Ringing the Bell”

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The timbre of the bell is said to dispel ominous presences and taints. It is meant as a form of purification. This does not mean that the bell should be rung loudly or for extended periods of time. Please take great care when ringing the bell.

Basics of Visiting 2: “Bow Twice, Clap Twice, Bow Once”

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Bow deeply twice.

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Place both hands near your heart and clap twice.

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Keep your hands together on your second clap, and greet and give thanks to the Tenjin god. If there is a particular wish you have, pray for it at this point.

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Bow deeply once more.

How to Hang Talismans

For those who will be hanging talismans within their residences, please place in a bright area like the living room where family members gather. Put the talismans higher than eye level. Placing them on top of cabinets or bookshelves is acceptable. Normally, talismans must be hung so that they face the south or east.

Returning Old Talismans or Charms

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When receiving new talismans or charms, it is customary to return old ones to the shrine. At our shrine, there is a site to accept the old charms on the left side after going past the Ro-mon Gate. Please return the talismans and charms while expressing your gratitude to the Tenjin god.

We are early to view the Momiji-en (Autumn Maple Garden). But, anyway, we still enjoyed the vicinity of this place.

After, we walked inside the shrine for about 3 hours, we had delicious lunch a different ramen we tasted. We (Hubby and I) will definitely to go back and eat this (shiroi) White Ramen as they called.

 

Thank you for visiting my blog. Have a great day!

♥lovelots♥

∇ΣΠÙ∫

Mt. Yoshino (Nara)

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This long overdue, so sorry I was busy with my son for his school preparation, we only have 1 weeks for that as the Grade 2 finished, a week after, his on Grade 3 already. But, at least he can write and speak Japanese already so, we’re not worried anymore. Anyway, let’s get started.
We had a great time viewing the Sakura (Cherry blossom) in Mt. Yoshino, Nara.

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Mt. Yoshino is well known from old times for the best cherry blossom site in Japan.
It covers all over the mountain paths around 8 kms, from the north end to the south of Omine Renzan mountains.
It is also a base of Omine spiritual mountain walk for decipliants. A path between Yoshino-Omine and Yuya is called Omine Okukudou and is still used for religeous training.
The spiritual site and path in Kii, including Mt. Yoshino, was approved as one of UNESCO World Heritage.
This means the area is registered in the World Heritage List per World Heritage Treaty for the purpose of maintaining the area as an indespensable property shared by all humans.
The whole Mt. Yoshino is registered as World Heritage: You can walk and visite various World Heritage Buildings including Yoshino Mikumari Shrine, Kinpu Shrine, Kinpusenji Temple and Yoshimizu Shrine.

You can also visit a variety of historical sites such as a temple of Ennogyoja (Ennnoozuno), historical site of Nanchou, Yoshitsune, Saigyou and Basho.
Not only spring Cherry blossom but hydrengea, autumn leaves and snowing landscape are also magnificent.

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With around 30,000 cherry trees decorating the mountain range, Nara Prefecture’s Mt. Yoshino is proudly regarded as “Japan’s best cherry blossom site.” The appearance of the cherry blossoms of these “sacred trees” continuously planted over 1,300 years across the mountainside dotted with World Heritage Listed temples and shrines, takes on an almost otherworldly beauty. While walking around this mountainside cherry blossom park of Mt. Yoshino, we introduce you to Hanakueshiki Festival, which is its main ceremonial event of spring, as well as the World Heritage Listed temples and shrines located here.

DSC_0058DSC_0065Rather than a free standing mountain, Yoshinoyama is a north-facing mountain slope. It is divided into four areas: the Shimo Senbon (lower 1000 trees) at the base of the mountain, Naka Senbon (middle 1000 trees), Kami Senbon (upper 1000 trees) and Oku Senbon (inner 1000 trees) at the top of the mountain. Visitors can enjoy the cherry trees as they ascend the mountain, passing Yoshino’s touristy town with its various temples and shrines, and enjoying hanami in the parks and viewpoints along the way.DSC_0067

The Shimo Senbon (lower) area encompasses the base of the mountain around Yoshino Station and the lower part of the town. The Yoshino Ropeway bypasses the steep ascent between the station and the town, but waiting times for the ropeway can get very long during the peak of the season. Lots of cherry trees are planted along the road up to the town, making the ascent on foot an attractive alternative to the ropeway.

The Naka Senbon (middle) area covers the rest of the town along the ridge of the mountain. This is where the majority of Yoshino’s accommodations, shops, restaurants, temples and shrines are found, including Kinpusenji Temple and Yoshimizu Shrine. The view up the mountain from Yoshimizu Shrine is particularly famous.

Towards the top of the Naka Senbon area lies the Naka Senbon Park, one of the most attractive spots for holding hanami picnics under the trees. The park spans several small hills that are covered by cherry trees and offer views onto even more cherry trees. Especially in good weather, the atmosphere here is delightful.

Further up the mountain in the Kami Senbon (upper) area, the town begins to thin out. Kami Senbon tends to be a little less crowded and slightly quieter than the lower parts of the mountain, and several small parks provide nice places to take a break. The most famous panoramic view of Yoshinoyama can be enjoyed from the Hanayagura View Point, about one hour on foot from the upper ropeway station.

The Oku Senbon area has by far the fewest cherry trees and does not offer any views of the cherry tree covered mountain slopes. However, the trees here bloom about a week behind the rest of Yoshinoyama, so it may be worth visiting if you are too late to see the blossoms along the lower slopes. The best hanami spot in the Oku Senbon area is the Takagiyama Observation Deck roughly a 90 minute walk from the ropeway station.

And, we didn’t know the bus we took is going down the mountain is not going to the train station. oh my, our boo boo experience. We have to ride again a bus going back to the top of the mountain and down to the Train station.

I had a time took a video from the bus and walking down the mountain, i hope you like it.

This is my first time to edit video and i don’t know if this is right in editing. anyway, for personal use only. 

 

Thank you for visiting….

***bye***

Snow Monkey (Nagano, Japan)

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I feel sick today nevertheless, i need to post blog. Sick of eating too much hahahaha… but, seriously, my tummy really hurts. Because we eat snacks at the Dessert Buffet. Who can refused cakes and ice cream a lot of variety I will just post it another time.

so, let’s get started… But before we start, i just want to share this lovely and cute folded towel in Disneyland hotel.

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It was Trigger and Winnie the pooh… We took train from Tokyo to Nagano Station and Nagano train again going to Yudanaka, Nagano.

Nagano (長野市 Nagano-shi?), the capital city of Nagano Prefecture, is located in the northern part of the prefecture near the confluence of the Chikuma and the Sai rivers, on the main Japanese island of Honshū.

As of April 1, 2011, the city has an estimated population of 387,146 and a population density of 460 persons per km². The total area is 834.85 km².

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We check-in in Suminoyu Hotel, Nagano from Yudanaka station they pick us up going to the Hotel. Take a look of our Hotel. It was very traditional Japanese style.

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Our Hotel I will say highly recommended, really… the staff our friendly and they will really feel you at home. So, we arrived in the Hotel around 2pm so, a bit early rest for a while and we go onsen (hot spring) around the area.

An onsen (温泉?) is a term for hot springs in the Japanese language, though the term is often used to describe the bathing facilities and inns around the hot springs. As avolcanically active country, Japan has thousands of onsen scattered along its length and breadth. Onsen were traditionally used as public bathing places and today play a central role in directing Japanese domestic tourism.

Onsen come in many types and shapes, including outdoor (露天風呂 or 野天風呂 roten-buro or noten-buro?) and indoor baths. Baths may be either publicly run by a municipality or private (内湯 uchiyu?) often run as part of a hotel, ryokan or bed and breakfast (民宿 minshuku?).

Onsen are a central feature of Japanese tourism, typically found out in the countryside, but there are a number of popular establishments still found within major cities. They are a major tourist attraction drawing Japanese couples, families or company groups who want to get away from the hectic life of the city to relax. Japanese often talk of the virtues of “naked communion” (裸の付き合い hadaka no tsukiai?)[1] for breaking down barriers and getting to know people in the relaxed homey atmosphere of a ryokan with an attached onsen. Japanese television channels often feature special programs about local onsens.[citation needed]

The presence of an onsen is often indicated on signs and maps by the symbol ♨ or the kanji, (yu, meaning “hot water”). Sometimes the simpler hiragana character ゆ (yu) is used, to be understandable to younger children.[citation needed]

Roten-buro outdoor onsen at Nakanoshima in Nachikatsuura, Wakayama

Indoor onsen at Ōfuka Onsen

Traditionally, onsen were located outdoors, although a large number of inns have now built indoor bathing facilities as well. Onsen by definition use naturally hot water fromgeothermally heated springs. Onsen should be differentiated from sentō, indoor public bath houses where the baths are filled with heated tap water.[citation needed]

The legal definition of an onsen includes that its water must contain at least one of 19 designated chemical elements, including such minerals as iron, sulfur, and metabolic acid and be 25 °C or warmer before being reheated. Stratifications exist for waters of different temperatures. Major onsen resort hotels often feature a wide variety of themed spa baths and artificial waterfalls in the bathing area utaseyu (打たせ湯?).

Onsen water is believed to have healing powers derived from its mineral content.[citation needed] A particular onsen may feature several different baths, each with water with a different mineral composition. The outdoor bath tubs are most often made from Japanese cypress, marble or granite, while indoor tubs may be made with tile, acrylic glass orstainless steel. Different onsen also boast about their different waters or mineral compositions, plus what healing properties these may contain. Other services like massages may be offered.[citation needed]

People often travel to onsen with colleagues, friends, couples or their families.[citation needed]

Alright, too much information… as you know we loved hot spring it’s really help to our body and warm up. We ate late lunch or let say snacks at the store Udon (Nagano Specialty)

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and as we walk by around the area you saw the Soft boiled Egg Onsen (hot spring).

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Amazing right, that’s really hot water. Anyway, we tried as well the feet onsen in front of our hotel. Look my lovely princess she keeps on laughing her big brother bec. the water is too hot.

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As we came back to our hotel time for dinner. We didn’t expect the food in hotel how generous they are. They served breakfast and dinner. Very tasty and a Japanese Style and we didn’t know which one will be first to eat hehehe… My hubby says you most eat the one in front of you and round the clock, from right to left. Take a look below.

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The Japanese macaque (/məˈkɑːk/;[2] Macaca fuscata), also known as the snow monkey, is a terrestrial Old World monkey species native to Japan. They get their name “snow monkey” because they live in areas where snow covers the ground for months each year – no other nonhuman primate is more northern-living, nor lives in a colder climate.[3][4] Individuals have brown-grey fur, red faces, and short tails. Two subspecies are known.[5]

In Japan, the species is known Parsazaru Nihonzaru (Nihon 日本 “Japan” + saru 猿 “monkey”) to distinguish it from other primates, but the Japanese macaque is very familiar in Japan, so when Japanese people simply say saru, they usually have in mind the Japanese macaque.

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They are so cute with their red face. They not that wild monkey of course don’t feed them that’s the golden rule.

As we go back to our hotel, we completed the 9 Hot spring in the area.

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We bought this towl in our hotel. They call it Junyoku Special Towel. At the nine Sotoyu Public baths and Takayakushi Shrines. The Ten Seals can also be stamped on the Junyoku japanese towel, which is available as a souvenir. If all the 10 seals are stamped on your towel, it is said you will be rewarded with divine favors such as the expulsion of evil spirits, safe delivery of babies, and perpetual youth and longevity. It has become very popular amoung tourist like us.  Below are some Public Hot Spring.

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We really loved to stay here and for sure will coming back with the same hotel as well. Love it, highly recommended. You will not regret to stay in this hotel.

Now, I just need to take a rest for a while. While writing this blog i go lie down for couple of minutes and back to write. 

***Bye for now ***

Disney Trip

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I think we (hubby and i) much excited than our kids. Well, kids at heart. Because we will experience the Hotel of the Disney which looking forward the theme and also the perks. And also, if it’s worth it to spend so much money in this hotel before I answer it let just pause here for a while here’s the picture to be judged.

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This is in-front of Hotel but you won’t see the sign of Hotel Disney Hotel (?)

This is our theme room we where excited to go inside but too early as they have to clean our room which check in time is 4pm. So, we decided  to go inside the park/amusement first. First, in Disneysea we took  the train lovely its first frozen theme. 

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The Disney train is just 5-10mins walk in front of our hotel, convenient right? 😀

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we had lunch buffet at Sailing Buffet Restaurant inside the DisneySea. So, yummy we had nice lunch.

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Surprise birthday cake for our princess  (lovely…)

Day2 : we had breakfast in Sherwood restaurant inside Tokyo Disney hotel this is a separate charge or payment aside from the hotel. Breakfast is not included once you booked in the hotel :-(. Anyway, just once in a lifetime experience and it was good a lot of variety foods.  

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We are in Disneyland now… We had time to go around not much people I mean not too crowded. My son, got time to ask the character to signed on his autograph. Last time we went here we don’t have this kind of autograph thing we just known in at USA Disney only. Now, they have here in Japan I don’t know in Hong Kong because the last time I went there nothing just taking some pictures with the characters. 

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Day 3: DisneySea again hehehe… But we had a great time in our lunch which is we had to booked lunch at Ambassador Hotel, Chef Mickey… Disney main character will dine in with us they will go table to table to meet and greet.  (Don’t ask the price very expensive, it just want to expereince it)

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Back to hotel rest for awhile and go to Disneyland (5mins walk from our hotel hehehe) our last day in park/amusement. Convenient to this hotel is just walk few walks and train going to the park/amusement. No need to rush to the train station to go home or back to city to your hotel. Below picture a ticket for the Disney Resort Line. 

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Well, that’s all folks our Disney Trip and if you want to stay in Disney Hotel, be my guess.

The 4th to 6th day Travel we went to Nagano, Japan… i’ll post soon the details. So, amazed with the Snow Monkey. —

***bye***

Asakusa trip

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Before heading to our real trip in Tokyo, we had 3days and 2nights at the Asakusa area. We took the bullet train from Osaka to Tokyo. We left in our house around 7am, and I still have time to eat breakfast in McDonald.   
 

Then, took a local train from the main station, Tokyo to Asakusa station I think we transfer twice, and the 2nd train doesn’t have elevator it was under renovation… Hubby tired lifting our luggage. 3 luggage I think more than 20kg, poor hubby right… That’s why we don’t want to travel in Tokyo because some old train station don’t have an elevator, not convenient for the traveller with a toddler.  

We arrived at our destination around past 12noon at Asakusa View Hotel, exhausted and we had to find something to eat especially for the kids for lunch. Luckily, Asakusa area there are a lot of eateries which we can’t decide, hehehe

http://www.viewhotels.co.jp/asakusa/

  
  

Rest for a while in the hotel. My hubby is excited about this area the Kappa-bashi is the kitchenware kitchen tool shops.

Kappabashi Dougu-Gai is a shopping street with more than a century-long history, located between Asakusa and Ueno in the shitamachi or old downtown area of Tokyo. The street, running 800 meters north to south, is lined with some 170 specialty stores offering Japanese, Chinese, and Western tableware and lacquerware, Japanese confectionery and bread makers, kitchen tools and utensils, food ingredients and packaging supplies, and more. The beauty is that even ordinary consumers can buy professional appliances and implements. Japanese kitchen knives and faux food samples are a favorite of foreign customers. 

Website:http://www.kappabashi.or.jp

  

We choose the hotel because they said (tv program) the breakfast is delicious, but, sad to say there is nothing special (sorry to disappoint) but, the location is really accessible. Or maybe, because we tried many hotels in our countries, that’s why our standard is high (?). 

Below are the sightseeing around Asakusa Area

 
 Kaminari Gate (furai shrine gate)

Built by Tairano Kinmasa in the 5th year of the Tengyou Era, this gate was originally located in the Komagata neighborhood. During the Kamakura Era it was dismantled and relocated to its current location. It is believed that that is when Wind God and God of Thunder were enshrined within.

At first they were to guard the temple. These two guards were worshipped with the goal of guarding against destruction from storm, flood and fire. They were seen as a kind of benevolent deity. Then it is surmised that the worship was for peace and tranquility, and abundant crop.

The current gate replaced the gate which was destroyed by fire on December 12, 1865. In 1960, after 95 years, the gate was reconstructed thanks to contributions by the founder of Matsushita Electrical Industrial, Kounosuke Matsushita. It now stands proudly as the main gate at of Sensou Shrine. It is famous nation wide as the face of Asakusa.

Website:http://www.senso-ji.jp/

   

 Nakamise Avenue

This roughly 250-meter-long path leading from the Kaminarimon (“Thunder Gate”) to Hozomon (“Treasure House Gate”) of Kinryuzan Sensoji Temple (also called “Kannon-sama”) in Asakusa is lined on both sides with close to 90 shops and stalls selling Edo-style trinkets and souvenirs.

  

Sensoji Temple

Founded in 628, Sensoji Temple is the oldest temple in Tokyo. Many people believe that the Asakusa Kannon deity enshrined here has the ability to bestow benefits on earth, and around 30 million visitors from throughout Japan and abroad visit the temple every year. It was the epicenter for the development of Edo culture, and these traces still remain today. Many seasonal events are held including the Hozuki (Chinese lantern plant) Market and Hagoita (wooden paddle) Market. The huge lanterns hung at Kaminari (Thunder) Gate are very famous throughout Japan.

Website:http://www.senso-ji.jp/about/index_e.html

   
   

TOKYO SKYTREE, at 634 meters high, is the world’s tallest free-standing broadcasting tower. The TEMBO DECK, located 350 meters above ground, commands a panoramic view of the Kanto region, and even Mt. Fuji in the distance when the sky is clear. At night, the tower is illuminated alternately in the beautiful pale blue “Iki” and violet “Miyabi” themes. Tokyo Solamachi, the neighboring commercial complex, is home to more than 300 establishments including a planetarium, an aquarium, and shops, which constantly transmit trends and information. TOKYO SKYTREE is a world-class landmark of Tokyo.

 

 Asakusa Engei Hall is the district’s only theater dedicated to rakugo. Besides this form of comical storytelling, it stages a variety of entertaining acts such as manzai and mandan stand-up comedy, magic, acrobatics, papercutting, and music.

The open year-round facility, as a rule, has no intermission between day and night acts. Spectators are welcome to show up at any time, leave at any time, and enjoy the traditional Japanese entertainment of rakugo for as long as they like.

   
 

Ueno Park (上野公園 Ueno Kōen?) is a spacious public park in the Ueno district of Taitō, Tokyo, Japan. The park was established in 1873 on lands formerly belonging to the temple of Kan’ei-ji. Amongst the country’s first public parks, it was founded following the western example as part of the borrowing and assimilation of international practices that characterizes the early Meiji period. The home of a number of major museums, Ueno Park is also celebrated in spring for its cherry blossoms and hanami. In recent times the park and its attractions have drawn over ten million visitors a year, making it Japan’s most popular city park.

Website: http://www.kensetsu.metro.tokyo.jp/toubuk/ueno/index_top.html

  

She loves chasing the bird. Drop by in the shopping street as while just look around. 

   
 
And i just want to share the train station connect which i always get dizzy looking at it…  

 

Ok, let’s park for awhile… Will post the next trip soon…

Thank you for your time reading/visiting my blog.

***bye***

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